National Press Club

"From Wasteland to Broadband: A Conversation with Newton Minow and FCC Chairman Julius Genachowski"

"From Wasteland to Broadband: A Conversation with Newton Minow and FCC Chairman Julius Genachowski"

May 9, 2011 7:00 PM

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Location: Ballroom

The George Washington University Global Media Institute and the National Press Club’s Eric Friedheim National Journalism Library cordially invite you to

"From Wasteland to Broadband: A Conversation with Newton Minow and FCC Chairman Julius Genachowski"

Moderated by GW School of Media and Public Affairs Director Frank Sesno

Monday, May 9, 2011
7pm-8:15pm
National Press Club Ballroom

On May 9, 1961, 35-year-old Newton Minow, newly appointed by President John F. Kennedy as Chairman of the Federal Communications Commission, delivered a history making address to the National Association of Broadcasters (NAB). Minow told the NAB that much of what he saw on television was very good. He also said that at its worst, television was a "vast wasteland" and that the public interest demanded more.

During his tenure at the FCC, Newton Minow helped make possible the first telecommunications satellite and opened new television channels by requiring that all sets have UHF receivers. In the years since, he has worked to promote the public interest as chairman of PBS, a board member of CBS, and chairman and vice chairman of the U.S. Presidential debates.

On May 9, 2011, the 50th anniversary of his historic address, Newton Minow will appear with current FCC Chairman Julius Genachowski for a conversation about the impact of his seminal speech and what the next half-century of telecommunications will hold.

The discussion will be moderated by the distinguished journalist and Director of The George Washington University School of Media and Public Affairs, Frank Sesno.

This event is hosted and produced by The George Washington University Global Media Institute and the National Press Club’s Eric Friedheim National Journalism Library.

RSVP
library@press.org
Or call (202)662-7524